Rejection Sensitivity, Self-Silencing and Aggression in Married Women

Mueeza Mustafa (BS, 2014-2018) Supervisor: Zaeema Farooq

The present study intended to find out the relationship between rejection sensitivity, self-silencing and aggression in married women. It was hypothesized that there would be a relationship between rejection sensitivity, self-silencing and aggression. It was also hypothesized that rejection sensitivity would predict aggression and self-silencing would be a mediator between the relationship of rejection sensitivity and aggression. Correlational research design was used. The sample compromised of N = 120 married women with age range 21-54 years and was collected using purposive sampling technique. The Adult-Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire (Downey & Feldman, 1996), The Silencing the Self-Scale (Jack & Dill, 1992) and The Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire (Buss & Perry, 1992) were used for data collection. Results revealed significant relationship between rejection sensitivity, self-silencing and aggression. Rejection sensitivity positively predicted self-silencing and aggression. Self-silencing also positively predicted aggression. Mediation through a series of regression analysis was done which revealed that self-silencing was a strong mediator between rejection sensitivity and aggression. These results have implications in various research settings, marital counseling, and couple therapy.

Keywords: Rejection sensitivity, self-silencing, aggression.

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